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Int J Clin Pract. 2017 Feb;71(2). doi: 10.1111/ijcp.12907. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Factors associated with efficacy of an ibuprofen/pseudoephedrine combination drug in pharmacy customers with common cold symptoms.

Author information

1
Center for Rhinology and Allergology, Wiesbaden, Germany.
2
Statistical Consultant, Ingelheim, Germany.
3
Department of Medical Affairs, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co KG, Ingelheim, Germany.
4
Department of Pharmacology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to explore factors affecting efficacy of treatment of common cold symptoms with an over-the-counter ibuprofen/pseudoephedrine combination product.

METHODS:

Data from an anonymous survey among 1770 pharmacy customers purchasing the combination product for treatment of own common cold symptoms underwent post-hoc descriptive analysis. Scores of symptoms typically responsive to ibuprofen (headache, pharyngeal pain, joint pain and fever), typically responsive to pseudoephedrine (congested nose, congested sinus and runny nose), considered non-specific (sneezing, fatigue, dry cough, cough with expectoration) and comprising all 11 symptoms were analysed. Multiple regression analysis was applied to explore factors associated with greater reduction in symptom intensity or greater probability of experiencing a symptom reduction of at least 50%.

RESULTS:

After intake of first dose of medication, typically ibuprofen-sensitive, pseudoephedrine-responsive, non-specific and total symptoms were reduced by 60.0%, 46.3%, 45.4% and 52.8%, respectively. A symptom reduction of at least 50% was reported by 73.6%, 55.1%, 50.9% and 61.6% of participants, respectively. A high baseline score was associated with greater reductions in symptom scores but smaller probability of achieving an improvement of at least 50%. Across both multiple regression approaches, two tablets at first dosing were more effective than one and (except for ibuprofen-sensitive symptoms) starting treatment later than day 2 of the cold was generally less effective.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS:

Efficacy of an ibuprofen/pseudoephedrine combination in the treatment of common cold symptoms was dose-dependent and greatest when treatment started within the first 2 days after onset of symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

common cold; ibuprofen; multiple regression analysis; pseudoephedrine; symptom score

Comment in

PMID:
27925348
PMCID:
PMC5347851
DOI:
10.1111/ijcp.12907
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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