Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2016 Dec 6;7:13605. doi: 10.1038/ncomms13605.

PET imaging-guided chemogenetic silencing reveals a critical role of primate rostromedial caudate in reward evaluation.

Author information

1
Department of Functional Brain Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, Japan.
2
Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
3
Systems Neuroscience Section, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi 484-8506, Japan.
4
Department of Radiopharmaceuticals Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, Japan.
5
Department of Molecular Imaging and Theranostics, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, Japan.

Abstract

The rostromedial caudate (rmCD) of primates is thought to contribute to reward value processing, but a causal relationship has not been established. Here we use an inhibitory DREADD (Designer Receptor Exclusively Activated by Designer Drug) to repeatedly and non-invasively inactivate rmCD of macaque monkeys. We inject an adeno-associated viral vector expressing the inhibitory DREADD, hM4Di, into the rmCD bilaterally. To visualize DREADD expression in vivo, we develop a non-invasive imaging method using positron emission tomography (PET). PET imaging provides information critical for successful chemogenetic silencing during experiments, in this case the location and level of hM4Di expression, and the relationship between agonist dose and hM4Di receptor occupancy. Here we demonstrate that inactivating bilateral rmCD through activation of hM4Di produces a significant and reproducible loss of sensitivity to reward value in monkeys. Thus, the rmCD is involved in making normal judgments about the value of reward.

PMID:
27922009
PMCID:
PMC5150653
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms13605
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Y.N., B.J., T.S., M.H., and T.M. are named as inventors on a patent application in Japan claiming subject matter related to the results described in this paper. The remaining authors declare no competing financial interests.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center