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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2017 Jan;40(1):41-49. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.10.006. Epub 2016 Dec 3.

Comparison of the BackJoy SitSmart Relief and Spine Buddy LT1 H/C Ergonomic Chair Supports on Short-Term Neck and Back Pain.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Chemistry, Texas Chiropractic College, Pasadena, TX.
2
Department of Clinical Specialties, Texas Chiropractic College, Pasadena, TX. Electronic address: Jward@txchiro.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to perform a needs assessment to determine whether short-term use of BackJoy SitSmart Relief and Spine Buddy LT1 H/C chair supports influences neck, upper back, and lower back pain.

METHODS:

Forty-eight college students (age, 27.5 ± 6.3 years; height, 1.72 ± 0.08 m; body mass, 78.7 ± 19.8 kg; time seated that day, 4.3 ± 2.8 hours; means ± SD) were recruited for this study. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to measure pain for the neck, upper back, and lower back regions. Subjects were randomized to sit in a stationary office chair for a single 12-minute period under 1 of 4 conditions: office chair only (control group), BackJoy SitSmart Relief and chair, freezer-cooled Spine Buddy LT1 H/C and chair, or microwave-heated Spine Buddy LT1 H/C and chair. Participants then completed a posttest Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. A between-within repeated-measures analysis of variance using the between-subject factor intervention (group) and within-subject factor time (baseline and posttest) was used to analyze study data.

RESULTS:

The main effect of time across the whole sample was statistically significant for neck (P = .000), upper back (P = .032), and lower back (P = .000) pain; however, there was no statistically significant interaction effect between intervention and time. Thus, as long as participants sat down and rested, symptoms improved similarly across the different groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this preliminary study, short-term and single use of a support product for an office chair had no additive effect on reducing neck and back pain.

KEYWORDS:

Ergonomics; Low Back Pain; Neck Pain; Patient Outcome Assessment; Self-Help Devices

PMID:
27919432
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.10.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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