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BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 5;16(1):433.

The cross-interaction between global and age-comparative self-rated health on depressive symptoms-considering both the individual and combined effects.

Shin J1,2, Park EC1,2, Lee SG3, Choi Y4, Kim JH4,5,6, Kim TH7.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Department of Hospital Administration, Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 210-752, South Korea.
4
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.
5
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea.
6
Institute on Aging, Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, South Korea.
7
Department of Hospital Administration, Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 210-752, South Korea. THKIM@yuhs.ac.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Numerous studies suggesting the relation between self-rated health (SRH) and depression have been reported using different measures. Therefore, we attempted to determine the difference in a depressive scale based on the different ways of measuring health between global SRH (SRH-global) and age-comparative SRH (SRH-age). Then, the combined effect of SRH-global and SRH-age on depressive symptoms was further investigated.

METHODS:

Data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA) from 2008 to 2012 were analyzed. We divided the SRH-global and SRH-age into three levels-high, middle, and low-and combined each into nine new categories (SRH-combi). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-10 Korean edition was used as the dependent variable.

RESULTS:

A total of 8621 participant were enrolled at baseline. Individuals with lower SRHs-age compared to SRH-global tended to be more vulnerable to depressive symptoms. Low SRH-global with low (b = 0.654, p < 0.001) and middle SRH-age (b = 0.210, p = 0.003) showed association with higher CESD scores. Participants with high SRH-global × low SRH-age also had higher scores (b = 0.536, p < 0.001) compared to the "middle SRH-global × middle SRH-age" reference group. In contrast, among the middle (b = -0.696, p < 0.001) and high SRH-global (b = -0.545, p < 0.001) groups, participants with superior SRH-age had statistically lower CESD scores than the reference group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although a sole general SRH has historically been widely used, it has been suggested that use of both general and age-comparative SRH would be more powerful and easy when we consider analyzing depression in old age.

KEYWORDS:

Age comparative; Combined; Depression; Old aged; Self-rated health

PMID:
27919247
PMCID:
PMC5139095
DOI:
10.1186/s12888-016-1098-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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