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Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2017 Feb;55(2):133-141. doi: 10.1080/15563650.2016.1263855. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Modeling the effect of succimer (DMSA; dimercaptosuccinic acid) chelation therapy in patients poisoned by lead.

Author information

1
a National Institute for Public Health and the Environment , Bilthoven , The Netherlands.
2
b National Poisons Information Center, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , The Netherlands.
3
c Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology , University of Nijmegen , Nijmegen , The Netherlands.
4
d City Hospital , National Poisons Information Service (Birmingham Unit) , Birmingham , UK.
5
e School of Biosciences , University of Birmingham , Birmingham , UK.
6
f ScitoVation , Research Triangle Park , Durham, NC , USA.
7
g Department of Intensive Care Medicine , University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , The Netherlands.
8
h Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University , Utrecht , The Netherlands.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Kinetic models could assist clinicians potentially in managing cases of lead poisoning. Several models exist that can simulate lead kinetics but none of them can predict the effect of chelation in lead poisoning. Our aim was to devise a model to predict the effect of succimer (dimercaptosuccinic acid; DMSA) chelation therapy on blood lead concentrations.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We integrated a two-compartment kinetic succimer model into an existing PBPK lead model and produced a Chelation Lead Therapy (CLT) model. The accuracy of the model's predictions was assessed by simulating clinical observations in patients poisoned by lead and treated with succimer. The CLT model calculates blood lead concentrations as the sum of the background exposure and the acute or chronic lead poisoning. The latter was due either to ingestion of traditional remedies or occupational exposure to lead-polluted ambient air. The exposure duration was known. The blood lead concentrations predicted by the CLT model were compared to the measured blood lead concentrations.

RESULTS:

Pre-chelation blood lead concentrations ranged between 99 and 150 μg/dL. The model was able to simulate accurately the blood lead concentrations during and after succimer treatment. The pattern of urine lead excretion was successfully predicted in some patients, while poorly predicted in others.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our model is able to predict blood lead concentrations after succimer therapy, at least, in situations where the duration of lead exposure is known.

KEYWORDS:

Chelation; DMSA; PBK model; chelation lead therapy model; dimercaptosuccinic acid; intoxication; lead; poisoning; succimer

PMID:
27919185
DOI:
10.1080/15563650.2016.1263855
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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