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Occup Environ Med. 2017 May;74(5):336-343. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2015-103507. Epub 2016 Oct 25.

Lifting and exertion injuries decrease after implementation of an integrated hospital-wide safe patient handling and mobilisation programme.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Environmental Health and The Center for Work, Health, and Wellbeing, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Department of Occupational Health Services, Partners HealthCare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
Center for Nursing Excellence, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
5
Patient Care Services Center for Nursing Excellence, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
6
Center of Community Based Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
7
New England Research Institutes, Watertown, Massachusetts, USA.
8
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
9
Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
10
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences Health and The Center for Work, Health, and Wellbeing, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
11
Boston College Law School, Newton Centre, Massachusetts, USA.
12
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

With increasing emphasis on early and frequent mobilisation of patients in acute care, safe patient handling and mobilisation practices need to be integrated into these quality initiatives. We completed a programme evaluation of a safe patient handling and mobilisation programme within the context of a hospital-wide patient care improvement initiative that utilised a systems approach and integrated safe patient equipment and practices into patient care plans.

METHODS:

Baseline and 12-month follow-up surveys of 1832 direct patient care workers assessed work practices and self-reported pain while an integrated employee payroll and injury database provided recordable injury rates collected concurrently at 2 hospitals: the study hospital with the programme and a comparison hospital.

RESULTS:

Safe and unsafe patient handling practice scales at the study hospital improved significantly (p<0.0001 and p=0.0031, respectively), with no differences observed at the comparison hospital. We observed significant decreases in recordable neck and shoulder (Relative Risk (RR)=0.68, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.00), lifting and exertion (RR=0.73, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.89) and pain and inflammation (RR=0.78, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.00) injury rates at the study hospital. Changes in rates at the comparison hospital were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Within the context of a patient mobilisation initiative, a safe patient handling and mobilisation programme was associated with improved work practices and a reduction in recordable worker injuries. This study demonstrates the potential impact of utilising a systems approach based on recommended best practices, including integration of these practices into the patient's plan for care.

PMID:
27919058
DOI:
10.1136/oemed-2015-103507
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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