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Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 Feb;46:20-26. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2016.10.014. Epub 2016 Dec 2.

Diet and the risk of head-and-neck cancer among never-smokers and smokers in a Chinese population.

Author information

1
Division of Public Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, and Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
2
Departments of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
3
Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
5
Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, West China Center of Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
7
Department of Oral Surgery, West China Center of Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, Sichuan, China.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jiangsu key lab of Cancer Biomarkers, Prevention and Treatment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Personalized Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, China.
9
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Fujian Medical University, Fujian, China.
10
Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China.
11
Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Department of Pathology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China.
12
Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
13
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Liaoning, China.
14
Department of Head & Neck Oncology, Henan Cancer Hospital, Henan, China.
15
Institute for Translational Epidemiology and Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City, NY, USA.
16
Department of Epidemiology and Center for Environmental Genomics, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
17
Division of Public Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, and Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. Electronic address: mia.hashibe@utah.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have been conducted in China to investigate the association between diet and the risk of head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between diet and HNC risk in the Chinese population and to examine whether smoking status has any effect on the risk.

METHODS:

Our multicenter case-control study included 921 HNC cases and 806 controls. We obtained information on the frequency of both animal- and plant-based food consumption. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs).

RESULTS:

The risk of HNC increased with more frequent consumption of processed meat and fermented foods but decreased with frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables. There was a significant increasing P for trend of 0.006 among smokers who consumed meat and an increased OR among smokers who consumed processed meat (OR 2.95, 95%CI 1.12-7.75). Protective odds ratios for vegetable consumption were observed among smokers only. We also observed protective odds ratios for higher egg consumption among never-smokers (P for trend=0.0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

Reduced HNC risks were observed for high fruit and vegetable intake, a finding consistent with the results of previous studies. Processed meat intake was associated with an increased risk. The role of dietary factors in HNC in the East Asian population is similar to that in European populations.

KEYWORDS:

Case-control study; Cigarette smoking; Diet; Fruit and vegetable consumption; Head-and-neck cancer; Meat intake

PMID:
27918906
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2016.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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