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J Crit Care. 2017 Apr;38:172-176. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.11.002. Epub 2016 Nov 5.

Development of an intensive care unit resource assessment survey for the care of critically ill patients in resource-limited settings.

Author information

1
Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Division of Critical Care Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: aleksandra.leligdowicz@uhn.ca.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Electronic address: satsb@uw.edu.
3
Department of Medicine, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: dr.jvdiaz.criticalcare@gmail.com.
4
Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: wx.stats@gmail.com.
5
Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Keenan Research Center at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: marshallj@smh.ca.
6
Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Department of Critical Care Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: Rob.Fowler@sunnybrook.ca.
7
Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Department of Critical Care Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: neill.adhikari@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Capacity to provide critical care in resource-limited settings is poorly understood because of lack of data about resources available to manage critically ill patients. Our objective was to develop a survey to address this issue.

METHODS:

We developed and piloted a cross-sectional self-administered survey in 9 resource-limited countries. The survey consisted of 8 domains; specific items within domains were modified from previously developed survey tools. We distributed the survey by e-mail to a convenience sample of health care providers responsible for providing care to critically ill patients. We assessed clinical sensibility and test-retest reliability.

RESULTS:

Nine of 15 health care providers responded to the survey on 2 separate occasions, separated by 2 to 4 weeks. Clinical sensibility was high (3.9-4.9/5 on assessment tool). Test-retest reliability for questions related to resource availability was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.99; mean (SD) of weighted κ values = 0.67 [0.19]). The mean (SD) time for survey completion survey was 21 (16) minutes.

CONCLUSIONS:

A reliable cross-sectional survey of available resources to manage critically ill patients can be feasibly administered to health care providers in resource-limited settings. The survey will inform future research focusing on access to critical care where it is poorly described but urgently needed.

KEYWORDS:

Intensive care unit; Low-resource setting; Survey; resources

PMID:
27918902
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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