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Nitric Oxide. 2017 Jan 30;62:24-31. doi: 10.1016/j.niox.2016.11.005. Epub 2016 Dec 2.

Vitamin C intake modify the impact of dietary nitrite on the incidence of type 2 diabetes: A 6-year follow-up in Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

Author information

1
Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Electronic address: fzhadaegh@endocrine.ac.ir.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is no epidemiological study on the association between dietary nitrate (NO3) and nitrite (NO2) and intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D).

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was therefore to examine the potential effect of dietary NO3 and NO2 on the occurrence of T2D.

DESIGN:

This longitudinal study was conducted within the framework of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) on 2139 T2D-free adults, aged 20-70 years, followed for a median of 5.8 y. Dietary intakes of NO3 and NO2 were estimated using a 168-food items validate semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, at baseline. Multivariate Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for diabetes risk score (DRS), and dietary intakes of fat, fiber and vitamin C, were calculated for residual energy-adjusted NO3 and NO2 intakes. Since significant interaction (P = 0.024) was found between NO2 and vitamin C intakes in the multivariable model, stratified analyses were done for < and ≥ median vitamin C intakes.

RESULTS:

Median (inter quartile range; IQR) daily intake of NO3 and NO2 were 410 mg/d (343-499) and 8.77 mg/d (7.53-10.2). An increased risk of T2D was observed among participants who had higher intake of total and animal-based NO2 in participants who had low vitamin C intake (HR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.45-4.05, HR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.12-3.15, respectively). We found no significant association between NO3 in overall, and plant- and animal sources as well, with the risk of T2D. Plant-derived NO2 was also unrelated to incidence of T2D.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicated that higher intakes of total and animal-based NO2 may be an independent dietary risk factor for development of T2D in subjects with lower vitamin C intakes.

KEYWORDS:

Nitrate; Nitrite; Type 2 diabetes; Vitamin C

PMID:
27916563
DOI:
10.1016/j.niox.2016.11.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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