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Ophthalmology. 2017 Mar;124(3):320-325. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.10.035. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

Optic Nerve Head Drusen Prevalence and Associated Factors in Clinically Normal Subjects Measured Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

Author information

1
Moise and Chella Safra Advanced Ocular Imaging Laboratory, Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
2
Moise and Chella Safra Advanced Ocular Imaging Laboratory, Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, New York, New York; George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.
3
Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Research Laboratory, Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York, New York; Department of Ophthalmology, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York. Electronic address: sungchulpark1225@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the prevalence of optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) in clinically normal subjects using enhanced depth imaging (EDI) optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to evaluate associated factors.

DESIGN:

Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study.

PARTICIPANTS:

Total of 130 clinically normal subjects.

METHODS:

Serial horizontal and vertical EDI OCT B-scans (interval between scans, ∼30 μm) of the optic nerve head (ONH) were obtained in both eyes of clinically normal subjects. Signs of ONHD were defined as horizontal hyperreflective bands perpendicular to the OCT beam with or without a signal-poor core. The minimum length of isolated hyperreflective bands was determined based on analysis of 34 eyes with clinically definite ONHD. Age, gender, ONH diameter, and axial length were obtained from participants.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence of ONHD in clinically normal subjects and its association with age, gender, ONH diameter, and axial length.

RESULTS:

Based on the measurements of 94 isolated hyperreflective bands in the 34 eyes with clinically definite ONHD, the minimum length of isolated hyperreflective ONHD bands in clinically normal subjects was set as 45 μm (mean minus 2 standard deviations). Among 260 clinically normal eyes (130 subjects; 68 women; mean age, 40±17 years), EDI OCT was positive for horizontal hyperreflective ONHD bands in 28 eyes (10.8%) of 19 subjects (14.6%). Of these 28 eyes, 25 eyes (9.6% of total 260 eyes) of 16 subjects (12.3% of total 130 subjects) showed isolated hyperreflective bands with no signal-poor core, and 3 eyes (1.2% of total 260 eyes) of 3 subjects (2.3% of total 130 subjects) showed a signal-poor core surrounded by hyperreflective bands. No significant differences were found in mean age (44 vs. 39 years; P = 0.121) or gender distribution (56% vs. 52% female; P = 0.766) between clinically normal subjects with hyperreflective ONHD bands and those without. Logistic regression analysis showed that a decrease in ONH diameter by 100 μm and axial length by 1 mm increased the odds of ONHD presence by 1.5-fold (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56 [confidence interval (CI), 1.22-2.00]; P < 0.001) and 2-fold (OR = 2.00 [CI, 1.15-3.49]; P = 0.015), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Subclinical ONHD may be more prevalent than previously believed. Significant associations of subclinical ONHD with smaller ONH and shorter axial length were found.

PMID:
27914831
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.10.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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