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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Dec 13;113(50):E8141-E8150. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

Identifying species of symbiont bacteria from the human gut that, alone, can induce intestinal Th17 cells in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115.
2
Department of Immunobiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719.
3
UCB Pharma, Slough, Berkshire SL1 3WE, United Kingdom.
4
Arizona Arthritis Center, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115; cbdm@hms.harvard.edu dm@hms.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Th17 cells accrue in the intestine in response to particular microbes. In rodents, segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) induce intestinal Th17 cells, but analogously functioning microbes in humans remain undefined. Here, we identified human symbiont bacterial species, in particular Bifidobacterium adolescentis, that could, alone, induce Th17 cells in the murine intestine. Similar to SFB, B. adolescentis was closely associated with the gut epithelium and engendered cognate Th17 cells without attendant inflammation. However, B. adolescentis elicited a transcriptional program clearly distinct from that of SFB, suggesting an alternative mechanism of promoting Th17 cell accumulation. Inoculation of mice with B. adolescentis exacerbated autoimmune arthritis in the K/BxN mouse model. Several off-the-shelf probiotic preparations that include Bifidobacterium strains also drove intestinal Th17 cell accumulation.

KEYWORDS:

Th17 cells; intestine; microbiota; mucosal immunology; probiotic

Comment in

PMID:
27911839
PMCID:
PMC5167147
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1617460113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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