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J Neurosci. 2016 Nov 9;36(45):11394-11401.

Neural Stem Cells to Cerebral Cortex: Emerging Mechanisms Regulating Progenitor Behavior and Productivity.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, tghashg@ncsu.edu ndwyer@virginia.edu.
2
Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064.
3
Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan.
4
Developmental Neurobiology, Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Klosterneuburg 3400, Austria.
5
GIGA-Neurosciences, University of Liège, CHU Sart Tilman, Liège 4000, Belgium, and.
6
Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 tghashg@ncsu.edu ndwyer@virginia.edu.

Abstract

This review accompanies a 2016 SFN mini-symposium presenting examples of current studies that address a central question: How do neural stem cells (NSCs) divide in different ways to produce heterogeneous daughter types at the right time and in proper numbers to build a cerebral cortex with the appropriate size and structure? We will focus on four aspects of corticogenesis: cytokinesis events that follow apical mitoses of NSCs; coordinating abscission with delamination from the apical membrane; timing of neurogenesis and its indirect regulation through emergence of intermediate progenitors; and capacity of single NSCs to generate the correct number and laminar fate of cortical neurons. Defects in these mechanisms can cause microcephaly and other brain malformations, and understanding them is critical to designing diagnostic tools and preventive and corrective therapies.

KEYWORDS:

Cux2; Fezf2; Kif20b; Lhx2; MADM; Sp2; UPR; cortical development; cytokinesis; lineage; microcephaly; mouse; neurogenesis

PMID:
27911741
PMCID:
PMC5125206
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2359-16.2016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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