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J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;56(1):297-303. doi: 10.3233/JAD-160424.

Physical Exercise Moderates the Relationship of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotype and Dementia Risk: A Population-Based Study.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
2
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
3
Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HE&I), McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
4
McMaster Institute for Research on Aging, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
5
Labarge Centre for Mobility in Aging, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Genetics and lifestyle independently determine dementia risk, but the interaction is unclear. We assessed the interactive relationship of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype and physical exercise on dementia risk over a 5-year period in 1,646 older adults from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging who were dementia-free at baseline. Physical exercise moderated the relationship between genotype and dementia (p < 0.01). Specifically, for APOE ɛ4 non-carriers, the odds of developing dementia were higher in non-exercisers than exercisers (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.44, 2.71, p < 0.001), whereas, for APOE ɛ4 carriers, the odds of developing dementia were not significantly different between non-exercisers and exercisers (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.46, 1.31, p = 0.34). Given that most individuals are not at genetic risk, physical exercise may be an effective strategy for preventing dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; apolipoprotein E4; dementia; exercise; physical activity; prevention

PMID:
27911292
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-160424
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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