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Psychiatry Investig. 2016 Nov;13(6):609-615. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

Gender Differences in Somatic Symptoms and Current Suicidal Risk in Outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.; Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.; Stress Research Institute, Inje University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
OR/RWD Team, Corporate Affairs·Health & Value Division, Pfizer Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon Medical School, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although somatic symptoms are common complaints of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), their associations with suicide are still unclear.

METHODS:

A total of 811 MDD outpatients of aged between 18 to 64 years were enrolled nationwide in Korea with the suicidality module of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and the Depression and Somatic Symptom Scale (DSSS).

RESULTS:

On stepwise regression analysis, current suicidality scores were most strongly associated with chest pain in men, and neck or shoulder pain in women. Severe chest pain was associated with higher current suicidality scores in men than in women, whereas severe neck or shoulder pain showed no significant differences between the genders. In conclusion, MDD patients of both sexes with suicidal ideation showed significantly more frequent and severe somatic symptoms than those without. Current suicidal risk was associated with chest pain in men, and neck or shoulder pain in women.

CONCLUSION:

We suggest that clinicians pay attention to patients' somatic symptoms in real world practice.

KEYWORDS:

Chest pain; Gender difference; Somatic symptom; Suicidality

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