Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Antiviral Res. 2017 Jan;137:134-140. doi: 10.1016/j.antiviral.2016.11.023. Epub 2016 Nov 27.

The FDA-approved drug sofosbuvir inhibits Zika virus infection.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
3
Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA; The Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA; School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA. Electronic address: brian.geiss@colostate.edu.

Abstract

The rapidly expanding Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic has affected thousands of individuals with severe cases causing Guillain-Barré syndrome, congenital malformations, and microcephaly. Currently, there is no available vaccine or therapy to prevent or treat ZIKV infection. We evaluated whether sofosbuvir, an FDA-approved nucleotide polymerase inhibitor for the distantly related hepatitis C virus, could have antiviral activity against ZIKV infection. Cell culture studies established that sofosbuvir efficiently inhibits replication and infection of several ZIKV strains in multiple human tumor cell lines and isolated human fetal-derived neuronal stem cells. Moreover, oral treatment with sofosbuvir protected against ZIKV-induced death in mice. These results suggest that sofosbuvir may be a candidate for further evaluation as a therapy against ZIKV infection in humans.

PMID:
27902933
PMCID:
PMC5182171
DOI:
10.1016/j.antiviral.2016.11.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center