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Int J Mol Sci. 2016 Nov 25;17(12). pii: E1974.

Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review.

Author information

1
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. atulvet@gmail.com.
2
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. komalvig@alasu.edu.
3
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. drbaganizi@gmail.com.
4
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. sahu.rajnish@gmail.com.
5
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. sdixit@alasu.edu.
6
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. vdennis@alasu.edu.
7
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. ssingh@alasu.edu.
8
Center for Nanobiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA. spillai@alasu.edu.

Abstract

Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG), etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts.

KEYWORDS:

biomaterials; natural; polymer; scaffolds; skin; synthetic; tissue engineering; wound healing

PMID:
27898014
PMCID:
PMC5187774
DOI:
10.3390/ijms17121974
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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