Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Sports Med. 2017 May;51(10):812-817. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096822. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Associations of specific types of sports and exercise with all-cause and cardiovascular-disease mortality: a cohort study of 80 306 British adults.

Author information

1
UKK Institute, Tampere, Finland.
2
Sport, Physical Education and Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
3
Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
Institute of Sport Sciences, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
5
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
6
Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
7
School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
8
Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM:

Evidence for the long-term health effects of specific sport disciplines is scarce. Therefore, we examined the associations of six different types of sport/exercise with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality risk in a large pooled Scottish and English population-based cohort.

METHODS:

Cox proportional hazards regression was used to investigate the associations between each exposure and all-cause and CVD mortality with adjustment for potential confounders in 80 306 individuals (54% women; mean±SD age: 52±14 years).

RESULTS:

Significant reductions in all-cause mortality were observed for participation in cycling (HR=0.85, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.95), swimming (HR=0.72, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.80), racquet sports (HR=0.53, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.69) and aerobics (HR=0.73, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85). No significant associations were found for participation in football and running. A significant reduction in CVD mortality was observed for participation in swimming (HR=0.59, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.75), racquet sports (HR=0.44, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.83) and aerobics (HR=0.64, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.92), but there were no significant associations for cycling, running and football. Variable dose-response patterns between the exposure and the outcomes were found across the sport disciplines.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings demonstrate that participation in specific sports may have significant benefits for public health. Future research should aim to further strengthen the sport-specific epidemiological evidence base and understanding of how to promote greater sports participation.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort study; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health; Sports

PMID:
27895075
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2016-096822
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center