Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acad Pediatr. 2017 Sep - Oct;17(7):697-705. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.11.013. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

Promoting Early Brain and Child Development: Perceived Barriers and the Utilization of Resources to Address Them.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address: andrew.garner@UHhospitals.org.
2
Statistical Research Consultants LLC, Schaumburg, Ill.
3
University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif.
4
Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Children's Hospital at Montefiore, New York, NY.
5
New York-Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.
6
Nathan Kline Institute of Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.
7
American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, Ill.
8
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Efforts to promote early brain and child development (EBCD) include initiatives to support healthy parent-child relationships, tools to identify family social-emotional risk factors, and referrals to community programs to address family risk factors. We sought to examine if pediatricians perceive barriers to implementing these activities, and if they utilize resources to address those barriers.

METHODS:

Data were analyzed from 304 nontrainee pediatricians who practice general pediatrics and completed a 2013 American Academy of Pediatrics Periodic Survey. Sample weights were used to decrease nonresponse bias. Bivariate comparisons and multivariable regression analyses were conducted.

RESULTS:

At least half of the pediatricians agreed that barriers to promoting EBCD include: a lack of tools to promote healthy parent-child relationships, a lack of tools to assess the family environment for social-emotional risk factors, and a lack of local resources to address family risks. Endorsing a lack of tools to assess the family environment as a barrier was associated with using fewer screening tools and community resources. Endorsing a lack of local resources as a barrier was associated with using fewer community resources and fewer initiatives to promote parent-child relationships. Interest in pediatric mental health was associated with using more initiatives to promote healthy parent-child relationships, screening tools, and community resources.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the majority of pediatricians perceive barriers to promoting EBCD, few are routinely using available resources to address these barriers. Addressing pediatricians' perceived barriers and encouraging interest in pediatric mental health may increase resource utilization and enhance efforts to promote EBCD.

KEYWORDS:

community resources; mental health; primary care; screening; social-emotional

PMID:
27890781
PMCID:
PMC5443705
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2016.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center