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Neurosci Lett. 2017 Jan 10;637:70-74. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.11.051. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

Perisylvian GABA levels in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Ankara Yıldırım Beyazıt University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey; Department of Psychiatry, Ankara Ataturk Training and Education Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Electronic address: miatagun@ybu.edu.tr.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical School, Memorial Campus 119 Belmont Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Ankara Yıldırım Beyazıt University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey; Department of Psychiatry, Ankara Ataturk Training and Education Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Ankara Ataturk Training and Education Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
5
Department of Radiology, Ankara Atatürk Training and Education Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; National Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Pittsburgh University Medical School, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
7
Psychotic Disorders Division, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical School, Memorial Campus 119 Belmont Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA; Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to measure GABA levels of perisylvian cortices in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Patients with schizophrenia (n=25), bipolar I disorder (BD-I; n=28) and bipolar II disorder (BD-II; n=20) were compared with healthy controls (n=30). 1H-MRS data was acquired using a Siemens 3T whole body scanner to quantify right and left perisylvian structures' (including superior temporal lobes) GABA levels. Right perisylvian GABA values differed significantly between groups [χ2=9.62, df: 3, p=0.022]. GABA levels were significantly higher in the schizophrenia group compared with the healthy control group (p=0.002). Furthermore, Chlorpromazine equivalent doses of antipsychotics correlated with right hemisphere GABA levels (r2=0.68, p=0.006, n=33). GABA levels are elevated in the right hemisphere in patients with schizophrenia in comparison to bipolar disorder and healthy controls. The balance between excitatory and inhibitory controls over the cortical circuits may have direct relationship with GABAergic functions in auditory cortices. In addition, GABA levels may be altered by brain regions of interest, psychotropic medications, and clinical stage in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Auditory cortex; Bipolar disorder; GABA; Magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Schizophrenia

PMID:
27890741
PMCID:
PMC5203804
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2016.11.051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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