Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2017 Jan;72:176-189. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2016.11.013. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

Developmental toxicity of nicotine: A transdisciplinary synthesis and implications for emerging tobacco products.

Author information

1
Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: lbe9@cdc.gov.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.
4
Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
6
Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
7
Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN, USA.
8
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry and Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
10
Simon Frasier University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
11
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
12
College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.
13
Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
14
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
15
Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.
16
Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, OR, USA.
17
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
18
Department of Medical Social Sciences Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

While the health risks associated with adult cigarette smoking have been well described, effects of nicotine exposure during periods of developmental vulnerability are often overlooked. Using MEDLINE and PubMed literature searches, books, reports and expert opinion, a transdisciplinary group of scientists reviewed human and animal research on the health effects of exposure to nicotine during pregnancy and adolescence. A synthesis of this research supports that nicotine contributes critically to adverse effects of gestational tobacco exposure, including reduced pulmonary function, auditory processing defects, impaired infant cardiorespiratory function, and may contribute to cognitive and behavioral deficits in later life. Nicotine exposure during adolescence is associated with deficits in working memory, attention, and auditory processing, as well as increased impulsivity and anxiety. Finally, recent animal studies suggest that nicotine has a priming effect that increases addiction liability for other drugs. The evidence that nicotine adversely affects fetal and adolescent development is sufficient to warrant public health measures to protect pregnant women, children, and adolescents from nicotine exposure.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic nicotine delivery systems; Nicotine; Priority/special populations

PMID:
27890689
PMCID:
PMC5965681
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2016.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center