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Trends Mol Med. 2017 Jan;23(1):1-3. doi: 10.1016/j.molmed.2016.10.006. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

HIV Vaccines: One Step Closer.

Author information

1
Immunology Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, University of Melbourne, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Haematology, Monash Health, Monash Hospital, 246 Clayton Road Clayton, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medical Biology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Immunology and Pathology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
2
Department of Immunology and Pathology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia. Electronic address: david.tarlinton@monash.edu.

Abstract

Currently there is no effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Four recently published studies in Cell and Immunity now show that using planned sequential boosting with antigens to guide the humoral response towards broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide a solution to achieving vaccination against HIV-1.

PMID:
27889424
DOI:
10.1016/j.molmed.2016.10.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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