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Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2017 Aug;402(5):767-773. doi: 10.1007/s00423-016-1533-x. Epub 2016 Nov 26.

Laparoscopic anterior versus endoscopic posterior approach for adrenalectomy: a shift to a new golden standard?

Author information

1
Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
3
Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, the Netherlands. s.kruijff@umcg.nl.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There has been an increased utilization of the posterior retroperitoneal approach (PRA) for adrenalectomy alongside the "classic" laparoscopic transabdominal technique (LTA). The aim of this study was to compare both procedures based on outcome variables at various ranges of tumor size.

METHODS:

A retrospective analysis was performed on 204 laparoscopic transabdominal (UMC Groningen) and 57 retroperitoneal (UMC Utrecht) adrenalectomies between 1998 and 2013. We applied a univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Mann-Whitney and chi-squared tests were used to compare outcome variables between both approaches.

RESULTS:

Both mean operation time and median blood loss were significantly lower in the PRA group with 102.1 (SD 33.5) vs. 173.3 (SD 59.1) minutes (p < 0.001) and 0 (0-200) vs. 50 (0-1000) milliliters (p < 0.001), respectively. The shorter operation time in PRA was independent of tumor size. Complication rates were higher in the LTA (19.1%) compared to PRA (8.8%). There was no significant difference in recovery time between both approaches.

CONCLUSIONS:

Application of the PRA decreases operation time, blood loss, and complication rates compared to LTA. This might encourage institutions that use the LTA to start using PRA in patients with adrenal tumors, independent of tumor size.

KEYWORDS:

Adrenalectomy; Approach; Laparoscopy; Retroperitoneal; Transabdominal

PMID:
27888343
PMCID:
PMC5506107
DOI:
10.1007/s00423-016-1533-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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