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Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2017 Feb;37(1):95-112. doi: 10.1016/j.iac.2016.08.004. Epub 2016 Oct 28.

Biologics in Chronic Urticaria.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.
2
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
3
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. Electronic address: tbcasale@health.usf.edu.

Abstract

Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined as wheals, angioedema, or both, that last more than 6 weeks. Second-generation antihistamines are considered the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, many patients will fail antihistamines and require alternative therapy, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Multiple biological agents have been evaluated for use in antihistamine-refractory CU, including omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin; omalizumab is the most efficacious. Because of the success of omalizumab, multiple new biologics that are directed at the IgE pathway are under investigation. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU.

KEYWORDS:

Biologics; Chronic urticaria; Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy; Omalizumab; Rituximab; TNF antagonist; Therapy

PMID:
27886913
DOI:
10.1016/j.iac.2016.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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