Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sensors (Basel). 2016 Nov 24;16(12). pii: E1983.

Remote Blood Glucose Monitoring in mHealth Scenarios: A Review.

Author information

1
Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy. giordano.lanzola@unipv.it.
2
Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy. eleonora.losiouk01@ateneopv.it.
3
Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy. sdelfave@dei.unipd.it.
4
Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy. andrea.facchinetti@dei.unipd.it.
5
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Woman and Child's Health, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy. alfonsogalderisi@gmail.com.
6
Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy. silvana.quaglini@gmail.com.
7
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy. lalo.magni@unipv.it.
8
Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy. claudio.cobelli@unipd.it.

Abstract

Glucose concentration in the blood stream is a critical vital parameter and an effective monitoring of this quantity is crucial for diabetes treatment and intensive care management. Effective bio-sensing technology and advanced signal processing are therefore of unquestioned importance for blood glucose monitoring. Nevertheless, collecting measurements only represents part of the process as another critical task involves delivering the collected measures to the treating specialists and caregivers. These include the clinical staff, the patient's significant other, his/her family members, and many other actors helping with the patient treatment that may be located far away from him/her. In all of these cases, a remote monitoring system, in charge of delivering the relevant information to the right player, becomes an important part of the sensing architecture. In this paper, we review how the remote monitoring architectures have evolved over time, paralleling the progress in the Information and Communication Technologies, and describe our experiences with the design of telemedicine systems for blood glucose monitoring in three medical applications. The paper ends summarizing the lessons learned through the experiences of the authors and discussing the challenges arising from a large-scale integration of sensors and actuators.

KEYWORDS:

Internet of Things (IoT) in health care; blood glucose sensors; mHealth; remote monitoring

PMID:
27886122
PMCID:
PMC5190964
DOI:
10.3390/s16121983
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

G.L., E.L., A.F., S.D.F., A.G. and S.Q. declare no conflict of interest. L.M. holds patent applications related to the control algorithms used with the AP; C.C. holds patent applications related to the control algorithms used with the AP, received research support from Sanofi-Aventis and Adocia and non-financial research support from Dexcom and Roche Diagnostics.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center