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BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Nov 24;16(1):700.

Epidemiology of and risk factors for neonatal candidemia at a tertiary care hospital in western China.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, Liuzhou Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Liuzhou, China, 545001.
2
Department of Neonatology, Liuzhou Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Liuzhou, China, 545001. fujinjianaa@126.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence and clinical characteristics of neonatal candidemia are poorly understood in western China. The aim of our study was to evaluate the epidemiological features of neonatal candidemia in the Liuzhou Maternity and Child Healthcare Hospital.

METHODS:

A retrospective case-control study was conducted between January 2012 and November 2015. Electronic databases were reviewed and data on Candida species were isolated from blood cultures and candidemia incidence, risk factors, and mortality were extracted. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to identify risk factors associated with candidemia.

RESULTS:

During the 4-year period, candidemia was identified in 69 newborns, for an incidence rate of 13.6 per 1000 admissions. Prolonged antibiotic therapy duration [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence incidence (95% CI) = 1.06, 1.01-1.10], total parenteral nutrition [OR, 95% CI = 6.03, 2.10-17.30] and neurodevelopmental impairment (OR, 95% CI = 7.34, 1.18-45.80) were all associated with increased odds of candidemia development in infants (P value was 0.010, 0.001, 0.033, respectively). The overall mortality rate was 7.2% in the candidemia group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy, presence of total parenteral nutrition and neurodevelopmental impairment were the major risk factors associated with neonatal candidemia. This study highlights the importance of the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of neonatal candidemia.

KEYWORDS:

Candidemia; Case-control study; Neonate; Risk factors

PMID:
27884125
PMCID:
PMC5121934
DOI:
10.1186/s12879-016-2042-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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