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BMC Med. 2016 Nov 24;14(1):178.

Differing association of alcohol consumption with different stroke types: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se.
2
Stroke Research Group, Neurology Unit, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK. susanna.larsson@ki.se.
3
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Stroke Research Group, Neurology Unit, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is protective against stroke, and whether any association differs by stroke type, is controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from prospective studies on alcohol drinking and stroke types.

METHODS:

Studies were identified by searching PubMed to September 1, 2016, and reference lists of retrieved articles. Additional data from 73,587 Swedish adults in two prospective studies were included. Study-specific results were combined in a random-effects model.

RESULTS:

The meta-analysis included 27 prospective studies with data on ischemic stroke (25 studies), intracerebral hemorrhage (11 studies), and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage (11 studies). Light and moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke, whereas high and heavy drinking was associated with an increased risk; the overall RRs were 0.90 (95 % CI, 0.85-0.95) for less than 1 drink/day, 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.87-0.97) for 1-2 drinks/day, 1.08 (95 % CI, 1.01-1.15) for more than 2-4 drinks/day, and 1.14 (95 % CI, 1.02-1.28) for more than 4 drinks/day. Light and moderate alcohol drinking was not associated with any hemorrhagic stroke subtype. High alcohol consumption (>2-4 drinks/day) was associated with a non-significant increased risk of both hemorrhagic stroke subtypes, and the relative risk for heavy drinking (>4 drinks/day) were 1.67 (95 % CI, 1.25-2.23) for intracerebral hemorrhage and 1.82 (95 % CI, 1.18-2.82) for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

CONCLUSION:

Light and moderate alcohol consumption was inversely associated only with ischemic stroke, whereas heavy drinking was associated with increased risk of all stroke types with a stronger association for hemorrhagic strokes.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol consumption; Meta-analysis; Prospective studies; Stroke

PMID:
27881167
PMCID:
PMC5121939
DOI:
10.1186/s12916-016-0721-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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