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BMC Med Educ. 2016 Nov 22;16(1):298.

Medical education in a foreign language and history-taking in the native language in Lebanon - a nationwide survey.

Author information

1
Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury School of Medicine, Lebanese American University, Byblos-Jbeil, Lebanon.
2
Lebanese American University School of Medicine, Lebanese American University Medical Center - Rizk Hospital, May Zahhar Street, P.O. Box: 11-3288, Ashrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon.
3
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Faculty of Medicine, Saint-Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon.
7
Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury School of Medicine, Lebanese American University, Byblos-Jbeil, Lebanon. sola.bahous@lau.edu.lb.
8
Lebanese American University School of Medicine, Lebanese American University Medical Center - Rizk Hospital, May Zahhar Street, P.O. Box: 11-3288, Ashrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon. sola.bahous@lau.edu.lb.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

With the adoption of the English language in medical education, a gap in clinical communication may develop in countries where the native language is different from the language of medical education. This study investigates the association between medical education in a foreign language and students' confidence in their history-taking skills in their native language.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study consisted of a 17-question survey among medical students in clinical clerkships of Lebanese medical schools. The relationship between the language of medical education and confidence in conducting a medical history in Arabic (the native language) was evaluated (n = 457).

RESULTS:

The majority (88.5%) of students whose native language was Arabic were confident they could conduct a medical history in Arabic. Among participants enrolled in the first clinical year, high confidence in Arabic history-taking was independently associated with Arabic being the native language and with conducting medical history in Arabic either in the pre-clinical years or during extracurricular activities. Among students in their second clinical year, however, these factors were not associated with confidence levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite having their medical education in a foreign language, the majority of students in Lebanese medical schools are confident in conducting a medical history in their native language.

KEYWORDS:

History-taking; Medical education; Native language; Self-reported confidence level; Survey

PMID:
27876043
PMCID:
PMC5120416
DOI:
10.1186/s12909-016-0826-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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