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Laryngoscope. 2017 Feb;127(2):309-320. doi: 10.1002/lary.26316. Epub 2016 Nov 22.

The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in chronic rhinosinusitis.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A.
2
Department of Surgery, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Many studies have reported that olfactory dysfunction frequently occurs in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) populations; however, the prevalence and degree of olfactory loss has not been systematically studied. The aims of this study were to use combined data to report the prevalence of olfactory dysfunction and to calculate weighted averages of olfactory test scores in CRS patients.

DATA SOURCES:

A search was conducted in PubMed and Scopus, following the methods of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guidelines.

REVIEW METHODS:

Studies reporting the prevalence of olfactory dysfunction using objective measures or olfactory test scores using validated scales were included.

RESULTS:

A total of 47 articles were included in a systematic review and 35 in the pooled data analysis. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in chronic rhinosinusitis was found to be 30.0% using the Brief Smell Identification Test, 67.0% using the 40-item Smell Identification Test, and 78.2% using the total Sniffin' Sticks score. Weighted averages ± standard deviation of olfactory test scores were 25.96 ± 7.11 using the 40-item Smell Identification Test, 8.60 ± 2.81 using the Brief Smell Identification Test, 21.96 ± 8.88 using total Sniffin' Sticks score, 5.65 ± 1.51 using Sniffin' Sticks-Threshold, 9.21 ± 4.63 using Sniffin' Sticks-Discrimination, 9.47 ± 3.92 using Sniffin' Sticks-Identification, and 8.90 ± 5.14 using the Questionnaire for Olfactory Disorders-Negative Statements.

CONCLUSIONS:

In CRS populations, a significant percentage of patients experience olfactory dysfunction, and mean olfactory scores are within the dysosmic range. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:309-320, 2017.

KEYWORDS:

Olfaction; chronic rhinosinusitis; prevalence; sinusitis; smell

PMID:
27873345
PMCID:
PMC5258829
DOI:
10.1002/lary.26316
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Zachary M. Soler is supported by grants from Entellus, Intersect and Optinose, which are not affiliated with this manuscript. Z.M.S. is a consultant for Olympus, which is not affiliated with this manuscript. Rodney J. Schlosser is supported by grants from OptiNose, Entellus, and IntersectENT, none of which are associated with this manuscript. R.J.S. is a consultant for Olympus and Meda, which are not affiliated with this study. Shaun A. Nguyen is a consultant for Roche Products Limited (UK) and CSL Behring, which are not affiliated with this study. There are no disclosures for Preeti Kohli, Akash N. Naik, or E. Emily Harruff.

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