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Sex Med Rev. 2016 Jan;4(1):53-62. doi: 10.1016/j.sxmr.2015.10.001. Epub 2016 Jan 8.

The Role of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Male Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain.

Author information

1
Fundamental Physical Therapy & Pelvic Wellness, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: debbiecohen@gmail.com.
2
Alvarado Hospital, Department of Sexual Medicine, San Diego, CA, USA; University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Urology, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Alvarado Hospital, Department of Sexual Medicine, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Sexual function is essential to good health and well-being in men. The relationship between male sexual function, pelvic floor function, and pelvic pain is complex and only beginning to be appreciated.

AIM:

The objectives of the current review are to examine these complex relationships, and to demonstrate how pelvic floor physical therapy can potentially improve the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions, including erectile dysfunction and dysfunction of ejaculation and orgasm.

METHODS:

Contemporary data on pelvic floor anatomy and function as they relate to the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions were reviewed.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Examination of evidence supporting the association between the male pelvic floor and erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory/orgasmic dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, respectively.

RESULTS:

Evidence suggests a close relationship between the pelvic floor and male sexual dysfunction and a potential therapeutic benefit from pelvic floor therapy for men who suffer from these conditions.

CONCLUSION:

Pelvic floor physical therapy is a necessary tool in a more comprehensive bio-neuromusculoskeletal-psychosocial approach to the treatment of male sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic prostatitis; Male; Pelvic floor; Pelvic pain; Sexual dysfunction

PMID:
27872005
DOI:
10.1016/j.sxmr.2015.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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