Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Microbiol. 2016 Nov 21;2:16216. doi: 10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.216.

The genome of Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK.
2
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
3
Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, Department of Biology, New York University, New York, New York 10003, USA.
4
Institute of Parasitology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H9X 3V9, Canada.
5
Institute for Genome Sciences, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.
6
Global Health Infectious Disease Research Program, Department of Global Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612, USA.
7
European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SD, UK.
8
Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G4, Canada.
9
Division of Molecular Structure and Function, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.
10
Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
11
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15224, USA.
12
New York Blood Center, New York, New York 10065, USA.
13
Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, M5S 1A8, Canada.
14
College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, New York 10003, USA.

Abstract

Human onchocerciasis is a serious neglected tropical disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus that can lead to blindness and chronic disability. Control of the disease relies largely on mass administration of a single drug, and the development of new drugs and vaccines depends on a better knowledge of parasite biology. Here, we describe the chromosomes of O. volvulus and its Wolbachia endosymbiont. We provide the highest-quality sequence assembly for any parasitic nematode to date, giving a glimpse into the evolution of filarial parasite chromosomes and proteomes. This resource was used to investigate gene families with key functions that could be potentially exploited as targets for future drugs. Using metabolic reconstruction of the nematode and its endosymbiont, we identified enzymes that are likely to be essential for O. volvulus viability. In addition, we have generated a list of proteins that could be targeted by Federal-Drug-Agency-approved but repurposed drugs, providing starting points for anti-onchocerciasis drug development.

PMID:
27869790
PMCID:
PMC5310847
DOI:
10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.216
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center