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J Couns Psychol. 2017 Jan;64(1):80-93. doi: 10.1037/cou0000176. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

Meta-analyses of the relationship between conformity to masculine norms and mental health-related outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, Indiana University Bloomington.
2
Division of Psychology, Nanyang Technological University.

Abstract

Despite theoretical postulations that individuals' conformity to masculine norms is differentially related to mental health-related outcomes depending on a variety of contexts, there has not been any systematic synthesis of the empirical research on this topic. Therefore, the authors of this study conducted meta-analyses of the relationships between conformity to masculine norms (as measured by the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-94 and other versions of this scale) and mental health-related outcomes using 78 samples and 19,453 participants. Conformity to masculine norms was modestly and unfavorably associated with mental health as well as moderately and unfavorably related to psychological help seeking. The authors also identified several moderation effects. Conformity to masculine norms was more strongly correlated with negative social functioning than with psychological indicators of negative mental health. Conformity to the specific masculine norms of self-reliance, power over women, and playboy were unfavorably, robustly, and consistently related to mental health-related outcomes, whereas conformity to the masculine norm of primacy of work was not significantly related to any mental health-related outcome. These findings highlight the need for researchers to disaggregate the generic construct of conformity to masculine norms and to focus instead on specific dimensions of masculine norms and their differential associations with other outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record.

PMID:
27869454
DOI:
10.1037/cou0000176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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