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J Autism Dev Disord. 2017 Feb;47(2):439-446. doi: 10.1007/s10803-016-2963-6.

Changes in Food Selectivity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, E.K. Shriver Center, UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North S3-324B, Worcester, MA, 01655, USA. linda.bandini@umassmed.edu.
2
Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA, 02215, USA. linda.bandini@umassmed.edu.
3
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, E.K. Shriver Center, UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North S3-317, Worcester, MA, 01655, USA.
4
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA, 02111, USA.
5
College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 336 Cunz Hall, 1841 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.
6
E.K. Shriver Center, UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North S3-24C, Worcester, MA, 01655, USA.

Abstract

Food selectivity is a common problem in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and has an adverse impact on nutrient adequacy and family mealtimes. Despite recent research in this area, few studies have addressed whether food selectivity present in children with ASD persists into adolescence. In this study, we assessed food selectivity in 18 children with ASD at two time points (mean age = 6.8 and 13.2 years), and examined changes in food selectivity. While food refusal improved overall, we did not observe an increase in food repertoire (number of unique foods eaten). These findings support the need for interventions early in childhood to increase variety and promote healthy eating among children with ASD.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; Childhood; Food refusal; Food selectivity; Nutrition

PMID:
27866350
PMCID:
PMC5310968
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-016-2963-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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