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Womens Health Issues. 2017 Mar - Apr;27(2):237-244. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2016.10.003. Epub 2016 Nov 15.

Predictors of Breast Cancer Worry in a Hispanic and Predominantly Immigrant Mammography Screening Population.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.
2
Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.
3
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Division of Academics, School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York; Avon Foundation Breast Imaging Center-New York Presbyterian, New York, New York.
4
Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian, New York, New York.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: pt140@columbia.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Worry about developing breast cancer (BC) has been associated with participation in screening and genetic testing and with follow-up of abnormal screening results. Little is known about the scope and predictors of BC worry in Hispanic and immigrant populations.

METHODS:

We collected in-person interview data from 250 self-identified Hispanic women recruited from an urban mammography facility (average age 50.4 years; 82% foreign-born). Women reported whether they worried about developing breast cancer rarely/never (low worry), sometimes (moderate worry), or often/all the time (high worry). We examined whether sociocultural and psychological factors (e.g., acculturation, education, perceived risk), and risk factors and objective risk for BC (e.g., family history, Gail model 5-year risk estimates, parity) predicted BC worry using multinomial and logistic regression.

RESULTS:

In multivariable models, women who perceived higher absolute BC risk (odds ratio, 1.66 [95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.14] for a one-unit increase in perceived lifetime risk) and comparative BC risk (e.g., odds ratio, 2.73, 95% confidence interval, 1.23-6.06) were more likely to report high BC worry than moderate or low BC worry. There were no associations between BC worry and indicators of objective risk or acculturation.

CONCLUSIONS:

In Hispanic women undergoing screening mammography, higher perceptions of BC risk, in both absolute and comparative terms, were associated independently with high BC worry, and were stronger predictors of BC worry than indicators of objective BC risk, including family history, mammographic density, and personal BC risk estimates.

PMID:
27863982
PMCID:
PMC5361219
DOI:
10.1016/j.whi.2016.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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