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Int J Cardiol. 2017 Feb 1;228:58-67. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.11.059. Epub 2016 Nov 11.

Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in twelve European countries results of the European cardiac rehabilitation registry.

Author information

1
Reha Sports Institute and Case Management Centre, Feldkirch, Austria. Electronic address: wbenzer@cable.vol.at.
2
Institut für Herzinfarktforschung, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
3
Department of Cardiology, Spital Tiefenau, Bern, Switzerland.
4
National Center of Rehabilitation and Palliation, University of Southern Denmark and University Hospital Odense, Denmark.
5
Hasselt University and Hartcentrum Hasselt, Belgium.
6
CV Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece.
7
Sports Medicine Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
8
State Hospital for Cardiology, Balatonfured, Hungary.
9
Serviço de Cardiologia, Hospital Santa Marta, Lisbon, Portugal.
10
Federal Health Center and National Center for Preventive Medicine, Moscow, Russia.
11
Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinic, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
12
Clinic for Diagnostic, Rehabilitation and Prevention of CV Diseases, Thalassotherapia Opatija, Croatia.
13
Park Klinikum Lazariterhof, Bad Krozingen, Germany.
14
Department of Psychology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

AIM:

Results from EuroCaReD study should serve as a benchmark to improve guideline adherence and treatment quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Europe.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Data from 2.054 CR patients in 12 European countries were derived from 69 centres. 76% were male. Indication for CR differed between countries being predominantly ACS in Switzerland (79%), Portugal (62%) and Germany (61%), elective PCI in Greece (37%), Austria (36%) and Spain (32%), and CABG in Croatia and Russia (36%). A minority of patients presented with chronic heart failure (4%). At CR start, most patients already were under medication according to current guidelines for the treatment of CV risk factors. A wide range of CR programme designs was found (duration 3 to 24weeks; total number of sessions 30 to 196). Patient programme adherence after admission was high (85%). With reservations that eCRF follow-up data exchange remained incomplete, patient CV risk profiles experienced only small improvements. CR success as defined by an increase of exercise capacity >25W was significantly higher in young patients and those who were employed. Results differed by countries. After CR only 9% of patients were admitted to a structured post-CR programme.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinical characteristics of CR patients, indications and programmes in Europe are different. Guideline adherence is poor. Thus, patient selection and CR programme designs should become more evidence-based. Routine eCRF documentation of CR results throughout European countries was not sufficient in its first application because of incomplete data exchange. Therefore better adherence of CR centres to minimal routine clinical standards is requested.

KEYWORDS:

Bench marking; Cardiac rehabilitation; Cardiovascular prevention programmes; Guideline adherence; Internet-based survey for cardiovascular disease; Patient selection; Quality assurance

PMID:
27863363
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.11.059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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