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Acta Paediatr. 2017 Mar;106(3):366-374. doi: 10.1111/apa.13672. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

Scoping review shows wide variation in the definitions of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants and calls for a consensus.

Author information

1
Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
UK Neonatal Collaborative, Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, Section of Neonatal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Swedish Neonatal Quality Register, Department of Pediatrics/Neonatal Services, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
5
Pediatrics and Neonatology Division, Ospedale Versilia, Viareggio, Italy.
6
Finnish Medical Birth Register and Register of Congenital Malformations, Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
7
Spanish Neonatal Network, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia, Spain.
8
Neonatal Research Network Japan, Maternal and Perinatal Center, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Swiss Neonatal Network, Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
10
Israel Neonatal Network, Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Sheba Medical Centre, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
11
Australia and New Zealand Neonatal Network, Department of Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand.
12
TIN Toscane Online, Unit of Epidemiology, Meyer Children's University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
13
Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network, Royal Hospital for Women, National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistic Unit, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

The use of different definitions for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has been an ongoing challenge. We searched papers published in English from 2010 and 2015 reporting BPD as an outcome, together with studies that compared BPD definitions between 1978 and 2015. We found that the incidence of BPD ranged from 6% to 57%, depending on the definition chosen, and that studies that investigated correlations with long-term pulmonary and/or neurosensory outcomes reported moderate-to-low predictive values regardless of the BPD criteria.

CONCLUSION:

A comprehensive and evidence-based definition for BPD needs to be developed for benchmarking and prognostic use.

KEYWORDS:

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia; Chronic lung disease; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Pulmonary insufficiency; Quality improvement

PMID:
27862302
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13672
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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