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Acad Emerg Med. 2017 Apr;24(4):458-466. doi: 10.1111/acem.13135. Epub 2017 Mar 17.

Minimizing Attrition for Multisite Emergency Care Research.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital-Troy, Troy, MI.
5
Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH.
7
Department of Emergency Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital-Royal Oak, Royal Oak, MI.
8
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas-Southwestern, Dallas, TX.
9
Department of Emergency Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA.
10
Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Heath & Science University, Portland, OR.
11
Department of Emergency Medicine, UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA.
12
Department of Emergency Medicine, Summa Health System, Akron, OH.
13
Department of Emergency Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Abstract

Loss to follow-up of enrolled patients (a.k.a. attrition) is a major threat to study validity and power. Minimizing attrition can be challenging even under ideal research conditions, including the presence of adequate funding, experienced study personnel, and a refined research infrastructure. Emergency care research is shifting toward enrollment through multisite networks, but there have been limited descriptions of approaches to minimize attrition for these multicenter emergency care studies. This concept paper describes a stepwise approach to minimize attrition, using a case example of a multisite emergency department prospective cohort of over 3,000 patients that has achieved a 30-day direct phone follow-up attrition rate of <3%. The seven areas of approach to minimize attrition in this study focused on patient selection, baseline contact data collection, patient incentives, patient tracking, central phone banks, local enrollment site assistance, and continuous performance monitoring. Appropriate study design, including consideration of these methods to reduce attrition, will be time well spent and may improve study validity.

PMID:
27859997
PMCID:
PMC5397346
[Available on 2018-04-01]
DOI:
10.1111/acem.13135
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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