Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2017 Jan;135(1):87-92. doi: 10.1111/acps.12665. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Changes in interleukin-6 levels during electroconvulsive therapy may reflect the therapeutic response in major depression.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
2
School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Seinäjoki Hospital District, Seinäjoki, Finland.
4
The Immunopharmacology Research Group, University of Tampere School of Medicine and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
5
Department of Neurosciences and Rehabilitation, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been reported to be elevated in major depressive disorder (MDD) but decreased by antidepressive medication. IL-6 levels are markedly elevated both after epileptic seizures and single electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) session, but long-term changes in IL-6 levels after ECT have not been studied. The correlation between immediate and long-term changes in proinflammatory cytokines and outcome after ECT was investigated.

METHOD:

Thirty patients suffering from MDD participated in the study. IL-6, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) levels were examined at baseline and at 2 and 4 h after the first, fifth and the last ECT sessions. The response to ECT was measured with Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS).

RESULTS:

ECT repeatedly caused an increase in IL-6 levels at the 4-h time point. However, the baseline IL-6 levels decreased among remitters, but not among non-remitters, towards the end of ECT. IL-1β levels were mostly below detectable level, and IL-1Ra levels did not change during and after ECT.

CONCLUSION:

ECT has distinct acute and long-term effects on IL-6 levels. Interestingly, the long-term effect of ECT on IL-6 seems to correlate with outcome, providing further evidence of the mechanism of action of ECT and supporting the inflammation theory in MDD.

KEYWORDS:

cytokine; electroconvulsive therapy; major depressive disorder; seizure

PMID:
27858966
DOI:
10.1111/acps.12665
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center