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J Surg Educ. 2017 Mar - Apr;74(2):277-285. doi: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2016.09.004. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Street Smarts and a Scalpel: Emotional Intelligence in Surgical Education.

Author information

1
University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida.
2
University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: provenzano@health.usf.edu.
3
Department of Surgery, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania.
4
Division of Pediatric Surgical Specialties, Children׳s Hospital of the Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate trends of emotional intelligence (EI) in surgical education and to compare the incorporation of EI in surgical education to other fields of graduate medical education.

DESIGN:

A MEDLINE search was performed for publications containing both "surgery" and "emotional intelligence" with at least one term present in the title. Articles were included if the authors deemed EI in surgical education to be a significant focus. A separate series of MEDLINE searches were performed with the phrase "emotional intelligence" in any field and either "surg*," "internal medicine," "pediatric," "neurology," "obstetric," "gynecology," "OBGYN," "emergency," or "psychiat*" in the title. Articles were included if they discussed resident education as the primary subject. Next, a qualitative analysis of the articles was performed, with important themes from each article noted.

SETTING:

Lehigh Valley Health Network in Allentown, PA.

RESULTS:

Eight articles addressed surgical resident education and satisfied inclusion criteria with 0, 1, and 7 articles published between 2001 and 2005, 2005 and 2010, and 2010 and 2015, respectively. The comparative data for articles on EI and resident education showed the following : 8 in surgery, 2 in internal medicine, 2 in pediatrics, 0 in neurology, 0 in OBGYN, 1 in emergency medicine, and 3 in psychiatry.

CONCLUSIONS:

Integration of EI principles is a growing trend within surgical education. A prominent theme is quantitative assessment of EI in residents and residency applicants. Further study is warranted on the integration process of EI in surgical education and its effect on patient outcomes and long-term job satisfaction.

KEYWORDS:

ACGME core competencies; Interpersonal Skills and Communication; Patient Care; Professionalism; emotional intelligence; graduate medical education; surgical education

PMID:
27856295
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsurg.2016.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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