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Asian J Surg. 2018 Mar;41(2):192-196. doi: 10.1016/j.asjsur.2016.10.001. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Surgical management of colorectal cancer for the aging population-A survey by the Japanese Society for Cancer of Colon and Rectum.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Fujita Health University, Toyoake City, Aichi, Japan. Electronic address: mats1025@fujita-hu.ac.jp.
2
Department of Surgery, Fujita Health University, Toyoake City, Aichi, Japan.
3
Koujinkai Daiichi Hospital, Katsusika-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The treatment policy of colorectal cancer in elderly patients is controversial due to a lack of specific guidelines. To clarify the present management of colorectal cancer for aged patients, a questionnaire survey was conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

METHODS:

Questionnaire forms were sent to the 430 member institutions of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

RESULTS:

The response rate of the surgical department to the questionnaire was 39%. Performance status was used for preoperative assessments, and electrocardiogram and ultrasonic cardiograms were conducted for cardiovascular evaluations in many institutions. The same extent of surgical procedures was often adopted for elderly and younger patients, and the frequency of a laparoscopic procedure was the same regardless of a patient's age. A simultaneous hepatectomy for hepatic metastasis was considered in one-third of institutions. In many institutions, intersphincteric resection for patients with possible sphincter-saving surgery was not considered for elderly patients with low rectal cancer.

CONCLUSION:

Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum member institutions often used the same surgical treatment strategies for both elderly and younger patients with the exception of performing intersphincteric resection.

KEYWORDS:

aged patient; colorectal cancer; elderly; surgery; surgical management

PMID:
27856106
DOI:
10.1016/j.asjsur.2016.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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