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Trends Ecol Evol. 2017 Feb;32(2):118-130. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2016.10.011. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Operationalizing Network Theory for Ecosystem Service Assessments.

Author information

1
Institute on the Environment and Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55108, USA. Electronic address: ledee@umn.edu.
2
Department of Ecology & Evolution and Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637, USA.
3
UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Ecosystem Services, Leipzig, Germany; Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
4
Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping ​58183, Sweden.
5
Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93117, USA.
6
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Institute of Biology, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
7
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; J.F. Blumenbach Institute of Zoology and Anthropology, University of Goettingen, Berliner Strasse 28, 37073 Goettingen, Germany.
8
Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, School of Geography Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.
9
ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.
10
UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Ecosystem Services, Leipzig, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
11
Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Abstract

Managing ecosystems to provide ecosystem services in the face of global change is a pressing challenge for policy and science. Predicting how alternative management actions and changing future conditions will alter services is complicated by interactions among components in ecological and socioeconomic systems. Failure to understand those interactions can lead to detrimental outcomes from management decisions. Network theory that integrates ecological and socioeconomic systems may provide a path to meeting this challenge. While network theory offers promising approaches to examine ecosystem services, few studies have identified how to operationalize networks for managing and assessing diverse ecosystem services. We propose a framework for how to use networks to assess how drivers and management actions will directly and indirectly alter ecosystem services.

KEYWORDS:

Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES); ecosystem services; natural resource management; network theory

PMID:
27856059
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2016.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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