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J Pediatr Surg. 2017 Jan;52(1):166-171. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2016.10.036. Epub 2016 Oct 28.

Increased capture of pediatric surgical complications utilizing a novel case-log web application to enhance quality improvement.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY. Electronic address: jason.fisher@nyumc.org.
2
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY.
3
Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Documenting surgical complications is limited by multiple barriers and is not fostered in the electronic health record. Tracking complications is essential for quality improvement (QI) and required for board certification. Current registry platforms do not facilitate meaningful complication reporting. We developed a novel web application that improves accuracy and reduces barriers to documenting complications.

METHODS:

We deployed a custom web application that allows pediatric surgeons to maintain case logs. The program includes a module for entering complication data in real time. Reminders to enter outcome data occur at key postoperative intervals to optimize recall of events. Between October 1, 2014, and March 31, 2015, frequencies of surgical complications captured by the existing hospital reporting system were compared with data aggregated by our application.

RESULTS:

780 cases were captured by the web application, compared with 276 cases registered by the hospital system. We observed an increase in the capture of major complications when compared to the hospital dataset (14 events vs. 4 events).

CONCLUSIONS:

This web application improved real-time reporting of surgical complications, exceeding the accuracy of administrative datasets. Custom informatics solutions may help reduce barriers to self-reporting of adverse events and improve the data that presently inform pediatric surgical QI.

TYPE OF STUDY:

Diagnostic study/Retrospective study.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level III - case control study.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic health record; Informatics; Pediatric; Quality improvement; Surgical complication

PMID:
27856010
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2016.10.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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