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J Clin Sleep Med. 2017 Feb 15;13(2):351-354. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.6472.

Orthosomnia: Are Some Patients Taking the Quantified Self Too Far?

Author information

1
Rush University Medical School, Chicago IL.
2
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

The use of wearable sleep tracking devices is rapidly expanding and provides an opportunity to engage individuals in monitoring of their sleep patterns. However, there are a growing number of patients who are seeking treatment for self-diagnosed sleep disturbances such as insufficient sleep duration and insomnia due to periods of light or restless sleep observed on their sleep tracker data. The patients' inferred correlation between sleep tracker data and daytime fatigue may become a perfectionistic quest for the ideal sleep in order to optimize daytime function. To the patients, sleep tracker data often feels more consistent with their experience of sleep than validated techniques, such as polysomnography or actigraphy. The challenge for clinicians is balancing educating patients on the validity of these devices with patients' enthusiasm for objective data. Incorporating the use of sleep trackers into cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia will be important as use of these devices is rapidly expanding among our patient population.

KEYWORDS:

cognitive behavioral therapy; insomnia; technology

PMID:
27855740
PMCID:
PMC5263088
DOI:
10.5664/jcsm.6472
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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