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Scand Cardiovasc J. 2017 Apr;51(2):106-113. doi: 10.1080/14017431.2016.1262546. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

A retrospective analysis of cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with ASV.

Author information

1
a The Hospital of Østfold , Fredrikstad , Norway.
2
b University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway.
3
c Department of Cardiology and Center for Cardiological Innovation, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
4
d Department of Internal Medicine , Diakonhjemmet Hospital , Oslo , Norway.
5
e Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences , Ås , Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The effect of long-term adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) on cardiovascular mortality and admission rates in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) has not been much studied. The aim of this study was primarily to investigate whether ASV therapy significantly reduced these parameters.

DESIGN:

We included 75 CHF patients on optimal medication and CSR ≥25% of sleeping time, in New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes II-IV and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 45%. Thirty-one patients were treated with ASV for >3-18 months and 44 patients served as a control group.

RESULTS:

Seven deaths (16%) in the control group and one death (3%) in the ASV treatment group had cardiovascular etiology. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding cardiovascular death (log rank p = 0.07; HR 0.18 (95% CI 0.02-1.44), p = 0.11) and combined cardiovascular death or readmissions, but there was a trend toward better outcome regarding cardiovascular event-free survival (log rank p = 0.06; HR 0.53 (95% CI 0.27-1.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

In CHF patients with CSR, 18 months ASV treatment did not significantly affect cardiovascular death or combined cardiovascular death or hospital admissions. But there was a trend toward better combined outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Heart failure; adaptive servo-ventilation; mortality

PMID:
27854123
DOI:
10.1080/14017431.2016.1262546
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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