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PLoS One. 2016 Nov 16;11(11):e0166411. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0166411. eCollection 2016.

Implementation of Patient-Centered Education for Chronic-Disease Management in Uganda: An Effectiveness Study.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
2
Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
3
Global Health Leadership Institute, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
4
College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
5
Department of Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
6
Department of Nephrology, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.
7
Department of Nephrology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The majority of non-communicable disease related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Patient-centered care is an essential component of chronic disease management in high income settings.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine feasibility of implementation of a validated patient-centered education tool among patients with heart failure in Uganda.

DESIGN:

Mixed-methods, prospective cohort.

SETTINGS:

A private and public cardiology clinic in Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adults with a primary diagnosis of heart failure.

INTERVENTIONS:

PocketDoktor Educational Booklets with patient-centered health education.

MAIN MEASURES:

The primary outcomes were the change in Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13), as well as the acceptability of the PocketDoktor intervention, and feasibility of implementing patient-centered education in outpatient clinical settings. Secondary outcomes included the change in satisfaction with overall clinical care and doctor-patient communication.

KEY RESULTS:

A total of 105 participants were enrolled at two different clinics: the Mulago Outpatient Department (public) and the Uganda Heart Institute (private). 93 participants completed follow up at 3 months and were included in analysis. The primary analysis showed improved patient activation measure scores regarding disease-specific knowledge, treatment options and prevention of exacerbations among both groups (mean change 0.94 [SD = 1.01], 1.02 [SD = 1.15], and 0.92 [SD = 0.89] among private paying patients and 1.98 [SD = 0.98], 1.93 [SD = 1.02], and 1.45 [SD = 1.02] among public paying patients, p<0.001 for all values) after exposure to the intervention; this effect was significantly larger among indigent patients. Participants reported that materials were easy to read, that they had improved knowledge of disease, and stated improved communication with physicians.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patient-centered medical education can improve confidence in self-management as well as satisfaction with doctor-patient communication and overall care in Uganda. Our results show that printed booklets are locally appropriate, highly acceptable and feasible to implement in an LMIC outpatient setting across socioeconomic groups.

PMID:
27851785
PMCID:
PMC5112982
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0166411
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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