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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Nov 29;113(48):E7645-E7654. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Lifestyle chemistries from phones for individual profiling.

Author information

1
Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037; pdorrestein@ucsd.edu abouslimani@ucsd.edu.
2
Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037.
4
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093.
5
Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
6
SCiLS GmbH, 28359 Bremen, Germany.
7
Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92307.
8
Department of Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla,CA 92037.

Abstract

Imagine a scenario where personal belongings such as pens, keys, phones, or handbags are found at an investigative site. It is often valuable to the investigative team that is trying to trace back the belongings to an individual to understand their personal habits, even when DNA evidence is also available. Here, we develop an approach to translate chemistries recovered from personal objects such as phones into a lifestyle sketch of the owner, using mass spectrometry and informatics approaches. Our results show that phones' chemistries reflect a personalized lifestyle profile. The collective repertoire of molecules found on these objects provides a sketch of the lifestyle of an individual by highlighting the type of hygiene/beauty products the person uses, diet, medical status, and even the location where this person may have been. These findings introduce an additional form of trace evidence from skin-associated lifestyle chemicals found on personal belongings. Such information could help a criminal investigator narrowing down the owner of an object found at a crime scene, such as a suspect or missing person.

KEYWORDS:

lifestyle chemistries; phones; skin; trace evidence

PMID:
27849584
PMCID:
PMC5137711
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1610019113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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