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J Diabetes Complications. 2017 Jan;31(1):108-113. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.10.026. Epub 2016 Oct 29.

Skin autofluorescence (a marker for advanced glycation end products) and erectile dysfunction in diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, AP-HP, Hôpital Maritime de Berck, F-62600 Berck, France; Department of Endocrinology-Nutrition, University of Picardie Jules Verne, F-80054 Amiens, France. Electronic address: youssef.kouidrat@gmail.com.
2
Department of Endocrinology-Nutrition, University of Picardie Jules Verne, F-80054 Amiens, France.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Univ. Lille, CNRS, CHU de Lille, UMR9193-PsychiC-SCALab, F-59000 Lille, France.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Erasme Hospital, ULB, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

AIM:

Although diabetes-related erectile dysfunction (ED) has many etiological factors, little is known about the putative pathophysiological role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Skin autofluorescence is a noninvasive marker of AGEs. Recent studies have evidenced a relationship between skin autofluorescence and several complications of diabetes. We hypothesized that AGEs (assessed by skin autofluorescence) are associated with ED in diabetes patients.

METHODS:

Between March 2014 and April 2015, 42 patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and 44 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) were consecutively enrolled in a descriptive, cross-sectional study and compared to 54 healthy controls. ED was evaluated via the 5-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Skin autofluorescence was measured on the volar aspect of the arm with an AGE-Reader.

RESULTS:

Patients with diabetes had a mean±standard deviation age of 50±15 and a mean duration of diabetes of 16±12years. Skin autofluorescence was strongly and significantly correlated with the IIEF-5 score in the T1D subgroup (r=-0.52; P=0.004), the T2D subgroup (r=-0.32; P<0.03) and in the whole group of diabetic patients (r=-0.49; P<0.0001). In multivariate analyses that controlled for potentially confounding clinical and biochemical factors, only skin autofluorescence was still significantly correlated with the IIEF-5 score (P<0.0001). A receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that a skin autofluorescence value ≥3.2AU determined severe ED with a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 87% in diabetic patients.

CONCLUSION:

Skin autofluorescence is significantly associated with ED in diabetes, independently of classical confounding factors.

KEYWORDS:

Advanced glycation end product; Cardiovascular risk; Diabetes; Erectile dysfunction; Microangiopathy; Skin autofluorescence

PMID:
27847146
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.10.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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