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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016 Dec 15;73(5):572-580.

Maternal and Breastmilk Viral Load: Impacts of Adherence on Peripartum HIV Infections Averted-The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition Study.

Author information

1
*Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; †Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; ‡Currently, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; §Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; ‖Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Parktown, South Africa; ¶UNC Project, University of North Carolina, Lilongwe, Malawi; #Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Center for AIDS Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; **Division of Global Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; and ††Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antiretroviral (ARV) interventions are used to reduce HIV viral replication and prevent mother-to-child transmission. Viral suppression relies on adherence to ARVs.

METHODS:

A 2-phase study was conducted using data from the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study. We included mothers randomized to 28 weeks of postpartum ARVs with ≥1 plasma or breastmilk specimen. All mothers who transmitted HIV to their infants from 2-28 weeks (n = 31) and 15% of mothers who did not (n = 232) were included. Adherence was measured by pill count [categorized as poor (0%-80%), partial (81%-98%), and near perfect (>98%)]. Associations between adherence and breastmilk RNA were assessed using mixed-effects models. Cox models were used to estimate associations between breastmilk RNA and HIV transmission. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we estimated the number of transmissions that would occur had everyone randomized to maternal ARVs been 90% and 100% adherent.

RESULTS:

Partial or near perfect ARV adherence significantly reduced the odds of having detectable (≥40 copies/mL) breastmilk RNA, compared with poor adherence (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.23, 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.67; OR 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16 to 0.81, respectively). Detectable breastmilk RNA was associated with increased breastmilk transmission compared with undetectable breastmilk RNA (hazard ratio 3.8, 95% CI: 1.2 to 12.1). All transmitting mothers had ≥1 plasma viral load specimen >100 copies per milliliter. An estimated similar number of transmissions would occur with 90% adherence compared with 100%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Helping patients adhere to ARVs throughout breastfeeding is important for realizing the full potential of recommended ARV interventions to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Maintaining plasma viral load <100 copies per milliliter may prevent breastmilk transmission.

PMID:
27846071
PMCID:
PMC5141681
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0000000000001145
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Davis, Dr. Rigdon, and Dr. Miller report grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) during the conduct of the study, and Dr. Davis is currently employed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Nelson reports grants from NIH and CDC during the conduct of the study; grants from Merck, GSK, and Janssen outside the submitted work. Dr. Hudgens reports grants from CDC, NIH, and Gates Foundation during the conduct of the study.

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