Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016 Nov 14;14(1):157.

Exercise stereotypes and health-related outcomes in French people living with HIV: development and validation of an HIV Exercise Stereotypes Scale (HIVESS).

Author information

1
Université Côte D'azur, LAMHESS, Nice, France. lgray@unice.fr.
2
Université Côte D'azur, LAMHESS, Nice, France.
3
CHU (Départment de Maladies Infectieuses), Université Côte D'azur, Archet 1, Nice, France.
4
CHU (Département de Santé Publique), Université Côte D'azur, Nice, France.
5
Université Paris-Diderot, EA 7334, (Patient-Centered Outcomes Research), Paris, France.
6
AP-HP, Hopital Bicêtre (Departement de Médecine Interne et d'Immunologie Clinique), Kremlin-Bicetre, France.
7
Départment de Maladies Infectieuses, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nîmes, Nimes, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The main objective of the current study was to develop and validate a French exercise stereotype scale for people living with HIV (PLHIV) in order to gain visibility to the possible barriers and facilitators for exercise in PLHIV and thus enhance their quality of life.

METHODS:

A series of four complementary studies was carried out with a total sample of 524 participants to: (a) develop a preliminary version of the HIV Exercise Stereotype Scale (HIVESS) (Stage 1), (b) confirm the factorial structure of the instrument (Stage 2), (c) evaluate the stability of the instrument (Stage 3), and (d) examine the construct and divergent validity of the scale (Stage 4).

RESULTS:

Results provided support for a 14-item scale with three sub-scales reporting stereotypes related to exercise benefits, exercise risks and lack of capacity for exercise with Cronbach's alphas of .77, .69 and .76 respectively. Results showed good factorial structure, strong reliability and indicators of convergent validity relating to self-efficacy, exercise and quality of life.

CONCLUSION:

The HIVESS presented satisfactory psychometric properties, constitutes a reliable and valid instrument to measure exercise stereotypes among PLHIV and has applications for future research and clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; HIV/AIDS; Scale development; Stereotypes

PMID:
27842557
PMCID:
PMC5109775
DOI:
10.1186/s12955-016-0562-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center