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Antiviral Res. 2017 Jan;137:41-48. doi: 10.1016/j.antiviral.2016.10.015. Epub 2016 Nov 11.

Reducing the global burden of HTLV-1 infection: An agenda for research and action.

Author information

1
University of Liege, Belgium; Chairs of the HTLV Taskforce of the Global Virus Network, USA. Electronic address: luc.willems@ulg.ac.be.
2
National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; Chairs of the HTLV Taskforce of the Global Virus Network, USA.
3
University of Insubria, Varese, Italy.
4
Imperial College, London, UK.
5
American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.
6
University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
7
Fundação Hemominas, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
8
Institute of Human Virology, Baltimore, USA.
9
University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
10
René Rachou Research Center, FIOCRUZ, Belo Brazil Horizonte, Brazil.
11
Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
12
Tropical Medical Institute Alexander von Humboldt, Lima, Peru.
13
Centre for Research in Infectious Disease, Dublin, Ireland.
14
National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, USA.
15
Hôpital Necker, Paris, France.
16
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, USA.
17
University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
18
St. George's University, Grenada.
19
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon, France.
20
Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
21
University of California, San Francisco, USA.
22
University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
23
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.
24
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
25
St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan.

Abstract

Even though an estimated 10-20 million people worldwide are infected with the oncogenic retrovirus, human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), its epidemiology is poorly understood, and little effort has been made to reduce its prevalence. In response to this situation, the Global Virus Network launched a taskforce in 2014 to develop new methods of prevention and treatment of HTLV-1 infection and promote basic research. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of two life-threatening diseases, adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, for which no effective therapy is currently available. Although the modes of transmission of HTLV-1 resemble those of the more familiar HIV-1, routine diagnostic methods are generally unavailable to support the prevention of new infections. In the present article, the Taskforce proposes a series of actions to expand epidemiological studies; increase research on mechanisms of HTLV-1 persistence, replication and pathogenesis; discover effective treatments; and develop prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines.

KEYWORDS:

HTLV-1; Leukemia; Oncogene; Retrovirus; Vaccine

PMID:
27840202
DOI:
10.1016/j.antiviral.2016.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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