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Carcinogenesis. 2017 Jan;38(1):2-11. doi: 10.1093/carcin/bgw118. Epub 2016 Nov 12.

Frequently mutated genes/pathways and genomic instability as prevention targets in liver cancer.

Author information

1
Center for Cancer Prevention and Drug Development, Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Section, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), 975 NE 10th Street BRC1207, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA and hiroshi-yamada@ouhsc.edu cv-rao@ouhsc.edu.
2
Stephenson Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Section, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.
3
Center for Cancer Prevention and Drug Development, Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Section, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), 975 NE 10th Street BRC1207, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA and hiroshi-yamada@ouhsc.edu.

Abstract

The incidence of liver cancer has increased in recent years. Worldwide, liver cancer is common: more than 600000 related deaths are estimated each year. In the USA, about 27170 deaths due to liver cancer are estimated for 2016. Liver cancer is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. For all stages combined, the 5-year survival rate is 15-17%, leaving much to be desired for liver cancer prevention and therapy. Heterogeneity, which can originate from genomic instability, is one reason for poor outcome. About 80-90% of liver cancers are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and recent cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed frequently mutated genes in HCC. In this review, we discuss the cause of the tumor heterogeneity based on the functions of genes that are frequently mutated in HCC. We overview the functions of the genes that are most frequently mutated (e.g. TP53, CTNNB1, AXIN1, ARID1A and WWP1) that portray major pathways leading to HCC and identify the roles of these genes in preventing genomic instability. Notably, the pathway analysis suggested that oxidative stress management may be critical to prevent accumulation of DNA damage and further mutations. We propose that both chromosome instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MIN) are integral to the hepatic carcinogenesis process leading to heterogeneity in HCC and that the pathways leading to heterogeneity may be targeted for prognosis, prevention and treatment.

PMID:
27838634
PMCID:
PMC5219050
DOI:
10.1093/carcin/bgw118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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